GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Nov 20, 2018 7:59 am

Algot Runeman wrote:escalade

Escalade !?!
Makes me think of a Cadillac ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:08 am

Algot Runeman wrote: Oh, perhaps a completely different view of bicameral.

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You mean, bicamelal ?

Algot Runeman wrote:Ah, but herps typically have only three chambers. How can we deal with that?


Well, by getting together a dromedary camel and a Bactrian camel, both photography addicts !

Just a pity I cannot draw as well as you do....


On a different topic :

E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:
Algot Runeman wrote:escalade

Escalade !?!
Makes me think of a Cadillac ...


Only if one can afford it....
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:49 am

televisor

/ˈtɛlɪvʌɪzə/
noun
1 An apparatus for transmitting and receiving television pictures in which a video signal is generated by the action of light on photoconductive cells after having passed through a revolving perforated disk, this signal controlling the brightness of a neon lamp which, in conjunction with a second disk, projects an image; (originally and especially) a device of this kind designed and patented by John Logie Baird. Now historical.
2 A person who works in the television industry, e.g. as a presenter. Now rare.
3 An organization that makes or broadcasts television programmes.

Origin
1920s; earliest use found in The Glasgow Herald. Probably partly from televis- + -or.

==========

Having dropped the term, today's average teenager shares video which may become as viral as the original televisors of the 1920s did.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Nov 21, 2018 1:28 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:televisor

So a televisor is NOT the supervisor overlooking the senior rest home's tellies?

Hurray! I can still watch porn even when I'll be committed there.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:05 am

gratuitous

/ɡrəˈtjuːɪtəs/
adjective
1 Done without good reason; uncalled for.
2 Given or done free of charge.

Origin
Mid 17th century: from Latin gratuitus ‘given freely, spontaneous’ + -ous.

==========

I am grateful that the roadside is grate-full so the city has efficient water runoff.
[It is Thanksgiving in the US today, and that results in a gratuitous pun, yet another you did not ask for.]

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Nov 23, 2018 6:54 am

peccant

/ˈpɛk(ə)nt/
adjective
archaic
1 Having committed a fault or sin.
2 Diseased or causing disease.

Origin
Late 16th century (in peccant (sense 2)): from Latin peccant- ‘sinning’, from the verb peccare.

==========

Like many before him, the king was puissant because he was peccant, taking his peoples' prosperity as his own.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Nov 24, 2018 8:38 am

crepitation

/ˌkrɛpɪˈteɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
1 A crackling or rattling sound.
1.1 Medicine A crackling sound made when breathing with an inflamed lung, detected using a stethoscope.

Origin
Mid 17th century: from French crépitation or Latin crepitatio(n-), from the verb crepitare (see crepitate).

==========

The fire's steady crepitation of sap-rich wood matched the random flight of small embers above the flame, almost a personal fireworks as the family sat by the campfire.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Nov 24, 2018 9:44 am

Algot Runeman wrote:crepitation

"This is weird!", said Jim. "Since we sat down to eat, I've been hearing a funny noise. Could it be a scavenger grinding its teeth, impatient for the campfire to go out?"

"Nah!" said Amos, "The crepitation you hear is just old Hank chewing his pemmican. he's got an audible TMJ problem."
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Nov 24, 2018 1:21 pm

Jawing About TMJ

Consultation plan:
Sad Sally Ann
Visited Dentist Dan,
A handsome man.

Significant crepitation
That rattling sensation.
She's seeking mitigation,
Not amplification.

Wire shut the jaw
And drink through a straw
To fully fix the flaw.
Her decision: "Naw!"
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Nov 25, 2018 8:52 am

lusophone

/ˈluːsəfəʊn/
adjective
Portuguese-speaking.

Origin
1970s: from luso- (representing Lusitania) + -phone.

==========

Brazil is the largest lusophone country.

[I imagine a noun form of the word describing a phone into which you speak your native language and Portuguese comes out of the receiver.]

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Nov 26, 2018 8:58 am

endotherm

/ˈɛndə(ʊ)θəːm/
noun
Zoology
An animal that is dependent on or capable of the internal generation of heat.
Compare with homeotherm
Often contrasted with ectotherm

Origin
1940s: from endo- ‘within’, on the pattern of homeotherm.

==========

Though a cat is an endotherm, capable of making its own body heat, it is very fond of lying in a sunny spot on the floor.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:43 am

exorbitant

/ɪɡˈzɔːbɪt(ə)nt/
adjective
(of a price or amount charged) unreasonably high.

Origin
Late Middle English (originally describing a legal case that is outside the scope of a law): from late Latin exorbitant- ‘going off the track’, from exorbitare, from ex- ‘out from’ + orbita ‘course, track’.

==========

I hope you will not consider it an exorbitant use of power that I use today's word as a springboard to improve yesterday's illustration. I thought it seemed to look like a wall projection, so I revised it. (Make Yourself Happier™)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:59 am

Algot Runeman wrote:exorbitant

Artificial satellites in LEO will sooner or later deorbit and burn up in the atmosphere, IOW, at their EOL they will finally be deorbitant.

But will satellites going too fast for their orbit finally leave the earth, IOW become exorbitant?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Nov 28, 2018 9:56 am

caret

/ˈkarət/
noun
A mark (‸, ⁁) placed below the line to indicate a proposed insertion in a text.

Origin
Late 17th century: from Latin, ‘is lacking’.

==========

I wish to use a caret to indicate where I want a comma inserted(comma) but it's not easy to do with a computer. Of course the mark is designed to be handwritten by a proofreader or editor onto a printed draft copy. It should look like the illustration.

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Apparently the standard US keyboard layout "caret" on the same key as the digit 6 is actually the circumflex, designed to appear above a vowel (â) by using a compose key sequence to combine the mark and the letter.

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Unicode does have a character for the caret U+2038 which is used in the example sentence. For the caret word insertion point, use Unicode U+2041 ( ), though you will notice it is not properly positioned below the line. Once again, it is intended to be written by hand.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Nov 29, 2018 9:19 am

cuticle

/ˈkjuːtɪk(ə)l/
noun
1 The dead skin at the base of a fingernail or toenail.
2 The outer cellular layer of a hair.
3 Botany / Zoology - A protective and waxy or hard layer covering the epidermis of a plant, invertebrate, or shell.
3.1 another term for epidermis

Origin
Late 15th century (denoting a membrane of the body): from Latin cuticula, diminutive of cutis ‘skin’.

==========

Clarice did her cuticles before going to the nail salon because she didn't want them to think she truly needed their help.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Nov 30, 2018 6:24 am

phrase-mongering

/freɪz-ˈmʌŋɡ(ə)rɪŋ/
noun
depreciative
The (especially habitual) use of grandiose or striking phrases.

Origin
Late 19th century; earliest use found in Frederic Harrison (1831–1923), positivist and author.

==========

Participants in the verbal craze we call WotD would never participate in vainglorious phrase-mongering. [Ahem!]

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Nov 30, 2018 8:50 am

Algot Runeman wrote:phrase-mongering

So now you think to clobber us with the phrase-mongering by Jacob Rees-Mogg, dubbed the "Honourable Member for the 18th century" in the British Parliament.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:35 pm

sophisticated

/səˈfɪstɪkeɪtɪd/
adjective
1 Having, revealing, or involving a great deal of worldly experience and knowledge of fashion and culture.
1.1 Appealing to or frequented by people who are sophisticated.
2 (of a machine, system, or technique) developed to a high degree of complexity.
2.1 (of a person or their thoughts, reactions, and understanding) aware of and able to interpret complex issues; subtle.


==========

It is difficult to tell, either I'm terribly sophisticated, eating dinner late (before doing WotD) or merely forgetful of a typically morning task.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:00 am

fabulous

/ˈfabjʊləs/
adjective
1 Extraordinary, especially extraordinarily large.
1.1 informal Very good; wonderful.
2 Having no basis in reality; mythical.

Origin
Late Middle English (in the sense ‘known through fable’): from French fabuleux or Latin fabulosus ‘celebrated in fable’, from fabula (see fable).

==========

Let us all admit. I am fabulous! Every day, without a break, I post a word for you to enjoy...even if you don't enjoy it. Too bad for you.
(There can be no doubt, this is yet another of the deluded tall tales generated from my daydreams.)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Dec 03, 2018 8:40 am

wuthering

/ˈwʌðərɪŋ/
adjective
Northern English
(of weather) characterized by strong winds.

Origin
Early 16th century: from late Middle English whither, wuther ‘rush, make a rushing sound’, probably of Scandinavian origin.

==========

Mount Washington in the US state of New Hampshire is only 6,288 ft feet tall, but it is a peak with a wuthering reputation. Sporting the second highest wind speed record, 231 mph, Mt. Washington hosts a year-round weather observatory. The highest recorded wind speed was in a cyclone (hurricane) off the coast of Australia.

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[Photo courtesy of Ann Williams]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:49 am

fissile

/ˈfɪsʌɪl/
adjective
1 (of an atom or element) able to undergo nuclear fission.
2 (chiefly of rock) easily split.

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘easily split’): from Latin fissilis, from fiss- ‘split, cracked’, from the verb findere.

==========

Maria made the hard decision not to marry Bob Shale on the basis that divorce would be inevitable, given the fissile nature of his name's namesake rock.
[Could this view, at all, explain the phrase "a rocky marriage"?

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:06 pm

Algot, your fabulous activity on this thread leads me to ask myself quite a few deep and sophisticated questions.
For instance, I wonder whether Emily Brontë ever visited Mount Washington.
And also, would the amount of uranium in shale increase its fissile character ?
Last edited by voralfred on Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:26 pm

voralfred wrote:...
And also if the amount of uranium in shale would increase its fissile character ?

I wouldn't try fracking it. You never know ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Dec 05, 2018 10:19 am

syllabus

/ˈsɪləbəs/
noun
1 The subjects in a course of study or teaching.
2 (in the Roman Catholic Church) a summary of points decided by papal decree regarding heretical doctrines or practices.

Origin
Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘concise table of headings of a discourse’): modern Latin, originally a misreading of Latin sittybas, accusative plural of sittyba, from Greek sittuba ‘title slip, label’.

==========

Cedric selected his course work from the school's catalog, creating a syllabus for his advisor to approve. He attempted to limit his heretical choices.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:39 am

zorbing

/ˈzɔːbɪŋ/
noun
mass noun
A sport in which one is secured inside a large transparent ball which is then rolled along the ground or down hills.

Origin
1990s: invented word from Zorb (the name of the ball used in this activity) + -ing.

==========

Sally seemed almost professional in her success with zorbing.

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