GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:19 am

Algot Runeman wrote:
voralfred wrote:Aren't pumpkins and terrifying phantoms rather stereotyipical at Halloween ?


I'm shocked, practically speechless!

How else would you expect it to be?

Should we be more concerned with spring flowers at this time of the year in the northern hemisphere?

(Well, considering the warm winds of phantom? climate change...maybe spring flowers are part of the fall scenery.) :cry:


Your virulent reaction likewise left me speechless. (this was a WOTD back in 2015, but still deserves bold and blue, doesn't it).
Fortunately my fingers are still functional (could you believe this was never a WOTD, nor was the verb "to function"?).

So I can assure you that it was all about making a cheap joke, though of course spring flowers are now in full bloom in the southern hemisphere (also none of these last two words were never a WOTD ).

So maybe you wont be too stringent, and will absolve me thanks to my suggesting three possible WOTD choices for the next time ODO uses a repeat ?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:25 am

Algot Runeman wrote:interval
... has progressed through many words with mostly no interrupting intervals.

To continue the trend to shrink ...
... has progressed through many words with mostly no interrupting intervals.
I wonder why Britenglish and/or Amerenglish use the expression "with no" instead of "without" (I don't know how Irenglish, Austrenglish, Zealenglish and Afrenglish handle it).

In Dutch/Flemish one would say something like:
... is voortgegaan doorheen veel woorden meestal zonder onderbrekende intervallen.
Which translated to English is:
... has progressed through many words mostly without interrupting intervals.

Actually Dutch/Flemish would say "without interrupting" OR "without intervals", because in this context "intervals" and "interrupting" mean the same thing.

But to conclude, if your answer would be "I have no clue", then I'll admit "vansgelijke".
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Nov 04, 2019 9:25 am

use the expression "with no" instead of "without"


(attempting a response with as little interval as possible)

I would not elevate my own idiosyncratic word selection to Amerenglish status.
Otherwise, I am entirely without an adequate response.

(now pausing, a hiatus, as it were, for much needed grammatical self-analysis)

With no regret,
Without doubt? you bet.
This small ditty, today,
Is all that you may get!
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Nov 04, 2019 10:05 am

minnow

/ˈmɪnəʊ/ [minn-oh]
noun
1 A small freshwater Eurasian fish of the carp family, which typically forms large shoals.
Phoxinus phoxinus, family Cyprinidae
1.1 Used in names of small freshwater fishes similar to the minnow, e.g. mudminnow, topminnow.
1.2 Fishing An artificial lure imitating a minnow.
2 A small or insignificant person or organization.

Origin
Late Middle English probably related to Dutch meun and German Münne, influenced by Anglo-Norman French menu ‘small, minnow’.

==========

After a full day of enjoyable fishing, Bob's net haul was the last, unused minnow in his bait bucket. He did not eat it.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Nov 04, 2019 11:48 am

voralfred wrote:So maybe you wont be too stringent, and will absolve me thanks to my suggesting three possible WOTD choices for the next time ODO uses a repeat ?


All of my remarks are *supposed* to be taken with a grain of salt (and occasionally a dash of cumin powder).

"Bold and blue" - Hmm. Is that the preferred convention for references back to officially used WotDs from the past? I think I have been simply making them bold (when I remember to check).

Your three recommendations will definitely become part of my alternates list which grows and shrinks, depending on the vagaries of the Lexico/ODO algorhithm.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:20 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:minnow

In the Flemish town Geraardsbergen they drink minnows to start the centuries old "Krakelingenworp" (since about 1393).

At the start of the festivities, the pastor-deacon, the mayor and the city council members all drink, from a 400 year old silver chalice, a swig of wine with a live little fish in it. They swallow the fish too. So they don't eat it, they drink it.

Whether the fish are little minnows, I don't know for sure.
But the Urban Dictionary claims that the "Minnesota Minnow Shot" is kind of a tradition.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Nov 05, 2019 7:50 am

henpeck

/ˈhɛnpɛk/ [hen-peck]
verb
[with object]usually as adjective henpecked
(of a woman) continually criticize and order about (her husband or other male partner)

==========

Henry hardly noticed that Hannah henpecked him. She also made sure he got himself off to work, dressed appropriately, and she took care of the bank accounts, just as his mamma had done for dad.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Nov 06, 2019 8:30 am

speckled

/ˈspɛkld/ [spek-ulld]
adjective
Covered or marked with a large number of small spots or patches of colour.

==========

Sarah searched the coop, but only found three speckled brown eggs. Breakfast was going to be small today.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:09 am

conspirator

/kənˈspɪrətə/ [konn-speh-rah-tur]
noun
A person who takes part in a conspiracy.

Origin
Late Middle English from Old French conspirateur, from Latin conspirator, from conspirat- ‘agreed, plotted’, from the verb conspirare (see conspire).

==========

He was not so much a conspirator as he was trying to keep the surprise birthday party a secret.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Nov 08, 2019 7:10 am

micron

/ˈmʌɪkrɒn/ [my-chron]
noun
A unit of length equal to one millionth of a metre, used in many technological and scientific fields.

Origin
Late 19th century from Greek mikron, neuter of mikros ‘small’.

==========

Moving only a single micron is very difficult to do, even with a very well tuned, adjustable microscope stage.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Nov 08, 2019 9:04 am

Algot Runeman wrote:micron
...
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The symbol for micron used to be µ (Greek letter mu).
But now, since 1960, it is µm.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:21 am

wallow

/ˈwɒləʊ/ [wah-low]
verb
[no object]
1 (chiefly of large mammals) roll about or lie in mud or water, especially to keep cool or avoid biting insects.
1.1 (of a boat or aircraft) roll from side to side.
2 wallow in(of a person) indulge in an unrestrained way in (something that one finds pleasurable)

Origin
Old English walwian ‘to roll about’, of Germanic origin, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin volvere ‘to roll’.

==========

I'm not sure how well it would have taken off, if the music had been called "Rock and Wallow".

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Nov 10, 2019 9:45 am

sheaf

/ʃiːf/ [sheef]
noun sheaves
1 A bundle of grain stalks laid lengthways and tied together after reaping.
1.1 A bundle of objects of one kind, especially papers.

Origin
Old English scēaf, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch schoof ‘sheaf’ and German Schaub ‘wisp of straw’, also to the verb shove.

==========

The chief thief grabbed the sheaf.
He wrapped it all in a banana leaf.
When he found that it wasn't bearer bonds,
He knew he'd get nothing but grief.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:01 am

nonsense

/ˈnɒns(ə)ns/ [non-sense]
noun
mass noun
1 Spoken or written words that have no meaning or make no sense.
1.1 as exclamation Used to show strong disagreement.
1.2 as modifier - Denoting verse or other writing intended to be amusing by virtue of its absurd or whimsical language.
2 Foolish or unacceptable behaviour.
2.1 count noun - Something ridiculously impractical or ill-advised.

Today, with little intelligence,
We seek some overdue recompense.
And try to finally recognize.
The vast importance of "nonsense".

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[It is of note for this forum topic, that nonsense has appeared 38 times over the years (before today), but that this is the first time we have given it the credit it deserves.]

["Nonsense!", you respond. "This place is constantly irreverent, inappropriate and foolish. It is part of the embedded culture!"]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Nov 11, 2019 10:56 am

Algot Runeman wrote:nonsense

A thick sheaf of nonsense is still nonsense.

And it could only be divided by zero BEFORE the Big Bang ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Nov 12, 2019 11:08 am

hemisphere

/ˈhɛmɪsfɪə/ [heh-mee-sveer]
noun
1 A half of a sphere.
1.1 A half of the earth, usually as divided into northern and southern halves by the equator, or into western and eastern halves by an imaginary line passing through the poles.
1.2 A half of the celestial sphere.
1.3 Each of the two parts of the cerebrum (left and right) in the brain of a vertebrate.

Origin
Late Middle English (in the sense ‘half the celestial sphere, the sky’): from Old French emisphere, via Latin from Greek hēmisphairion, from hēmi- ‘half’ + sphaira ‘sphere’.

==========

We must skitter across half the globe to explore the southern hemisphere.
(Well, actually we probably didn't actually start at the north pole.)

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[Astute veterans of the WotD topic will recognize that the blue-bold word (which was suggested by ODO/Lexico today) is a previously used word. That it is also underlined allows each of us to also do a flashback via link to the earlier use. Go ahead and see for yourself.]
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:55 am

myology

/mʌɪˈɒlədʒi/ [my-olo-gee]
noun
mass noun

The study of the structure, arrangement, and action of muscles.

==========

Cal sat silently contemplating Sally's leg muscles as she went through her daily workout. He explained his stare as part of his myology studies.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Wed Nov 13, 2019 10:24 am

Algot Runeman wrote:myology
... He explained his stare as part of his myology studies. ...

Hey, it would be a fine excuse to claim myology when I'm staring at pictures of pretty women.

Only problem is, the body parts I tend to look at have no muscles ... Image
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Nov 14, 2019 7:59 am

corsair

/kɔːˈsɛː/ /ˈkɔːsɛː/ [coarse-air]
noun
1 archaic A pirate.
1.1 A pirate ship.
1.2 A privateer, especially one operating along the southern shore of the Mediterranean in the 16th–18th centuries.

Origin
Mid 16th century from French corsaire, from medieval Latin cursarius, from cursus ‘a raid, plunder’, special use of Latin cursus ‘course’, from currere ‘to run’.

==========

Frank flew his corsair's flag with pride, even though it had no crossbones.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Nov 15, 2019 8:48 am

interminable

/ɪnˈtəːmɪnəb(ə)l/ [interm-in-able
adjective
Endless or apparently endless (often used hyperbolically)

Origin
Late Middle English from Old French, or from late Latin interminabilis, from in- ‘not’ + terminare (see terminate).

==========

We are currently enduring what seems to be interminable, deep cold weather, and it is only mid November.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Nov 16, 2019 7:48 am

tweed

/twiːd/
noun
mass noun
1 A rough-surfaced woollen cloth, typically of mixed flecked colours, originally produced in Scotland.
as modifier ‘a tweed sports jacket’
1.1 tweeds - Clothes made of tweed.

Origin
Mid 19th century originally a misreading of tweel, Scots form of twill, influenced by association with the River Tweed.

==========

Todd wore his tweed
While he planted the seed
Because he agreed
It was chilly, indeed.

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Last edited by Algot Runeman on Sat Nov 16, 2019 10:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sat Nov 16, 2019 10:04 am

Algot Runeman wrote:tweed
...
Todd wore his tweed
While he planted the seed
Because he agreed
It was chilly, indeed.
...

One can hope he did bequeath his Irish tweed in his deed?

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:21 am

morph

/mɔːf/ [morf]
verb
1 Change smoothly from one image to another by small gradual steps using computer animation techniques.
with object - ‘the characters can be morphed on screen’
1.1 Undergo or cause to undergo a gradual process of transformation.
no object - ‘the cute moppet has morphed into the moody moll of the indie world’
noun
1 An image that has been morphed.
1.1 An instance of morphing an image.

Origin
1990s element from metamorphosis.

==========

GIF animations are accomplished using a sequence of separate images which morph to appear like a movie.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:25 pm

If I keep wallowing in interminably reading the WOTD without making the effort of posting, I may suffer the fate of Ulysses' sailors at the hands of Circe : morph into a stupid animal unable to speak....
And a tweed-clad one, at that !

Am I skittering from one nonsense to the next one ? I expect that EPS will roosterpeck me for that !
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:15 am

voralfred wrote:... I expect that EPS will roosterpeck me for that !

Forget it!
I wouldn't morph , nor even touch your pecker with a pair of hedge shears!
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