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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:36 am
by Algot Runeman
schwa

/ʃwɑː/
noun
Phonetics
The unstressed central vowel (as in a moment ago), represented by the symbol /ə/ in the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Origin
Late 19th century: from German, from Hebrew šěwā'.

▰ ▱ ▰ ▱ ▰ ▱ ▰

The schwa is a very short, neutral vowel sound which may be represented by several different vowel letters.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:16 am
by Algot Runeman
gratitude

/ˈɡratɪtjuːd/
noun
mass noun
The quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness.

Origin
Late Middle English: from Old French, or from medieval Latin gratitudo, from Latin gratus ‘pleasing, thankful’.

▰ ▱ ▰ ▱ ▰ ▱ ▰

Each day, I approach this word of the day with gratitude, another opportunity to use the English language and to share its bounty with others.

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[It surprised me to see that this word was available on the US day of Thanksgiving. The word of the day is broadly shared worldwide, of course. I admit to often having a narrow focus.]

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:00 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:gratitude

Your tireless WotD input, each and every day, has my tubeless gratitude.

P.S. The hairier you get, the more you remind me of Harry (aka Hairy Red), the lovable character in Footfall by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle.

Spoiler: show
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 7:08 am
by Algot Runeman
apian

/ˈeɪpɪən/
adjective
Relating to bees.

Origin
Early 19th century: from Latin apianus, from apis ‘bee’.

◁◂◀◁◂◀◁◂◀◁◂◀

Honey is apian dinner and a treat for both humans and bears.


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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 7:04 am
by Algot Runeman
vivacious

/vʌɪˈveɪʃəs//vɪˈveɪʃəs/
adjective
(especially of a woman) attractively lively and animated.

Origin
Mid 17th century: from Latin vivax, vivac- ‘lively, vigorous’ (from vivere ‘to live’) + -ious.

✀ ✀ ✀ ✀ ✀

Joey considered his gilrlfriend a cut-up while she preferred to think of herself as vivacious.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:07 am
by Algot Runeman
supersede

/ˌsuːpəˈsiːd/
verb
[with object]
Take the place of (a person or thing previously in authority or use); supplant.

Origin

Late 15th century (in the sense ‘postpone, defer’): from Old French superseder, from Latin supersedere ‘be superior to’, from super- ‘above’ + sedere ‘sit’. The current sense dates from the mid 17th century.

⌳⌳⌳⌳⌳⌳⌳⌳⌳⌳

Sid sought to supersede Stan as CTO of Sampson and Sons. He succeeded in succeeding Stan, but only because Stan shifted to CEO.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 2:58 pm
by Algot Runeman
etagere
(also étagère)

/ˌɛtəˈʒɛː/
noun
A piece of furniture with open shelves for displaying ornaments.

Origin
French étagère, from étage ‘shelf’.

⍅⍅⍅⍅⍅⍅⍅

It may finally be time to go to the table saw to build an etagere for the 3D printing done this past year.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:34 am
by Algot Runeman
combination

/kɒmbɪˈneɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
1 A joining or merging of different parts or qualities in which the component elements are individually distinct.
1.1 mass noun The process of combining different parts or qualities or the state of being combined.
1.2 A particular arrangement of different elements.
1.3 (in sport) a coordinated and effective sequence of moves.
1.4 as modifier Denoting an object or process that unites different uses, functions, or ingredients.
1.5 Chemistry mass noun The joining of substances in a compound with new properties.
2 A sequence of numbers or letters used to open a combination lock.
3 British A motorcycle with a sidecar attached.
4 combinationsBritish dated A single undergarment covering the body and legs.
5 Mathematics
A selection of a given number of elements from a larger number without regard to their arrangement.

Origin
Late Middle English: from late Latin combinatio(n-), from the verb combinare ‘join two by two’ (see combine).

♥ ♦ ♣ ♠ ♥ ♦ ♣ ♠ ♥ ♦ ♣ ♠

There are so many possible combinations, it is easy to write something, but far from easy to thoroughly combine all the meanings into one sentence or illustration.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:52 am
by Algot Runeman
remuda

/rəˈmuːdə/
noun
North American
A herd of horses that have been saddle-broken, from which ranch hands choose their mounts for the day.

Origin
Late 19th century: via American Spanish, from Spanish, literally ‘exchange, replacement’.

∢∢∢∢∢∢∢∢∢

Randy rode the roan wrangled from the rugged ranch's remuda. Bonnie was his favorite ride.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:43 am
by Algot Runeman
entice

/ɪnˈtʌɪs//ɛnˈtʌɪs/
verb
[with object]
Attract or tempt by offering pleasure or advantage.
with object and infinitive ‘the treat is offered to entice the dog to eat’

Origin
Middle English (also in the sense ‘incite, provoke’; formerly also as intice): from Old French enticier, probably from a base meaning ‘set on fire’, based on an alteration of Latin titio ‘firebrand’.

-=-=-=-=-

Tina enticed Tony with stir-fry and rice.
He reacted with a grin, "That's nice."
She smiled gently in return.
When will men ever learn?

Her plan was very clear.
Keep her man in good cheer.
Keep him cozy and close.
With good food's daily dose.

Their family, happy and snug.
In a cottage with a rug.
The children to bed retired.
And Tony sits, satisfied and tired.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:05 pm
by voralfred
Your posts keep enticing me to find a vivacious reply. Alas, alas, alas, my zeal to join the game is often superseded by my laziness, because I fail to ideate an adequate combination of words to ornament this thead.
But I want to express my gratitude for your efforts !


I wonder whether "Alas, alas, alas" qualifies as a palilogy, or is a mere repetition

Incidentally, if you allow me this saltus, I did not quite understand the rationale behind (so to speak) the illustration for the word synopsis, but I sure appreciated it!

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:10 am
by Algot Runeman
Incidentally, if you allow me this saltus, I did not quite understand the rationale behind (so to speak) the illustration for the word synopsis, but I sure appreciated it!


The figure is somewhat abbreviated, a mere synopsis of the real thing. Yet, it is clearly not obvious that some of the image is missing. Nobody who saw it grasped the meaning quickly, though some grudgingly accepted the explanation I gave. Your mileage may vary.

Occasional visits, no matter how widespread are eagerly appreciated, by the way.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:58 am
by Algot Runeman
rambunctious

/ramˈbʌŋ(k)ʃəs/
adjective
North American
informal
Uncontrollably exuberant; boisterous.

Origin
Mid 19th century: of unknown origin.

-=-=-=-=-=-

Ruby raced around the house. She was a rambunctious puppy, jumping onto the sofa before bounding to Sarah's feet and bouncing on hind feet, licking Sarah's outstretched hands. She raced off again, out the dog door and then, clack, slap, back inside again.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 02, 2017 8:19 am
by Algot Runeman
obsecration

/ˌɒbsɪˈkreɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
mass noun - rare
Earnest pleading or supplication.

Origin
Late Middle English: from Latin obsecratio(n-), from obsecrare ‘entreat’, based on sacer, sacr- ‘sacred’.

==========

Harold tried fervently to avoid being obsequious as he asked for help again. His obsecration was sincere.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:27 am
by Algot Runeman
ducky

/ˈdʌki/
noun
British
informal
Dear (used as a form of address)
adjective
North American
informal
Charming; delightful.

Origin
Early 19th century: from duck.

==========

Everything here is just ducky, Ducky! Thanks for asking.

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[[Is this a cheap trick, or am I just an artistic quack?]]

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2017 1:35 pm
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:ducky

So Dr. Mallard's nickname in NCIS is actually a double pun.

Ducky!

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:31 am
by Algot Runeman
fabulist

/ˈfabjʊlɪst/
noun
1 A person who composes or relates fables.
1.1 A liar, especially one who invents elaborately dishonest stories.

Origin
Late 16th century: from French fabuliste, from Latin fabula (see fable).

==========

It is not that common for a fabulist to be a writer. Most weave their oddly plausible lies in spoken words. Therefore, others may be blamed for mis-recording those words.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:41 am
by Algot Runeman
vicereine

/ˈvʌɪsreɪn/
noun
1 The wife of a viceroy.
1.1 A female viceroy.

Origin
Early 19th century: from French, from vice- ‘in place of’ + reine ‘queen’.

==========

Vicereine Barbara bore her boring tasks with aplomb. Helping her was an abundant supply of plum wine. Perhaps her husband's posting would not last too much longer.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:17 am
by Algot Runeman
filibeg

/ˈfɪlɪbɛɡ/
(also philibeg)
noun
Scottish
historical
A kilt.

Origin
Mid 18th century: from Scottish Gaelic feileadh-beag ‘little kilt’, from feileadh ‘plaid’ and beag ‘little’.

==========

William wore his filibeg on Fridays unless it was a special occasion. This week, Wednesday was Wanda's birthday. The plaid was perfect for the occasion.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:01 am
by Algot Runeman
circuitous

/səːˈkjuːɪtəs/
adjective
(of a route or journey) longer than the most direct way.

Origin
Mid 17th century: from medieval Latin circuitosus, from circuitus ‘a way around’ (see circuit).

==========

In a vain attempt to be direct, John described the circuitous mental journey which lead to his decision.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2017 11:49 pm
by voralfred
You have explained on various occasion that the way to create your WoTD post starting from its published source, usually ODO (BTW, what does this acronym mean ?) is not too circuitous.
But you also add example sentences, and illustrations. And kept on doing that for years now.
You have my heart-felt gratitude.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 1:10 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
voralfred wrote:... BTW, what does this [ODO] acronym mean ? ...

If I'm not mistaken, ODO used to be the Oxford Dictionaries Online.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OxfordDictionaries.com

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 7:34 am
by Algot Runeman
dalek

/ˈdɑːlɛk/
noun
A member of a race of hostile alien machine-organisms which appeared in the BBC television science fiction series Doctor Who from 1963.

Origin
1960s: invented by the scriptwriter Terry Nation ( 1930–97).

==========

Hundreds of Daleks glided over the turf in their polycarbonate armor. The were set on destroying the opposition, all opposition. "Exterminate!", they spoke simultaneously through their shielded speakers. It was not a shout, but the intensity of sound from their multitude sent chills up the spines of every human in range.

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[Voralfred, Thanks for the kind comment. ODO, correctly identified by stalwart E.P.S., is now calling its site "Oxford Living Dictionaries" and continues to be the primary source from which the daily definitions come. I will admit, unctuously that words do not always originate there. Today's dictionary-chosen word was a repeat, and thus a banned entity on this forum. As timing would have it, my current 3D project is a present for a grandchild who loves "Doctor Who". The dictionary does include a definition, so repetition is avoided, and an illustration is easily in hand. Is "OLD" going to work better as an acronym reference to the dictionary? I wonder.]

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 8:00 am
by Algot Runeman
mochaccino

/ˌmɒkəˈtʃiːnəʊ/
noun
Cappuccino coffee containing chocolate syrup or chocolate flavouring.

Origin
1980s: blend of mocha and cappuccino.

==========

Choice chocolate is the key to a good mochaccino in the morning, or at noon, or in the evening.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2017 7:10 am
by voralfred
Algot Runeman wrote:mochaccino

/ˌmɒkəˈtʃiːnəʊ/
noun
Cappuccino coffee containing chocolate syrup or chocolate flavouring.

Origin
1980s: blend of mocha and cappuccino.

==========

Choice chocolate is the key to a good mochaccino in the morning, or at noon, or in the evening.

(...)


Well, for a really great mochaccino you want choice chocolate and unctuouness too !


Incidentally, I prefer ODO to OLD. All the more so that the three main participants of this game are YOUNG retirees, aren't we ?