GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Jan 29, 2018 7:17 am

argle-bargle

/ˌärɡəlˈbärɡəl//ˌɑrɡəlˈbɑrɡəl/
noun
1 Copious but meaningless talk or writing; nonsense.
2 another term for argy-bargy

Origin
Early 19th century: reduplication of dialect argle, a late 16th-century alteration of argue.

==========

Over the years, there has been plenty of argle-bargle put forth here as part of the WotD. One could argue that some words did, occasionally, make sense.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Mon Jan 29, 2018 8:56 am

Algot Runeman wrote:argle-bargle

Said one Hogwarts' senior to the other:"I've joined the Argle-Bargle Debate Club. Did you?"
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Tue Jan 30, 2018 12:43 am

I don't quite understand. Are argy-bargy and argle-bargle really equivalent ?
And what about argie-bargie?

We could have an unending sophistic argument-bargument about these deep existential questions !
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jan 30, 2018 6:20 am

ebrious

/ˈiːbrɪəs/
adjective
rare
Drunken or intoxicated.

Origin
Mid 16th century: from Latin ebrius + -ous.

==========

It is sad to say, while the word ebrious is rare in 2018, being drunk behind the wheel is all too common.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Jan 30, 2018 6:56 am

Are argy-bargy and argle-bargle really equivalent ?
And what about argie-bargie?

We could have an unending sophistic argument-bargument about these deep existential questions !


If you think it is wise.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Tue Jan 30, 2018 12:06 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:
Are argy-bargy and argle-bargle really equivalent ?
And what about argie-bargie?

We could have an unending sophistic argument-bargument about these deep existential questions !


If you think it is wise.


Well, maybe I'll think so if I am ebrious enough.....
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:21 am

analects
(also analecta)

/ˈanəlɛkts/
plural noun
A collection of short literary or philosophical extracts.

Origin
Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek analekta ‘things gathered up’, from analegein ‘pick up’, from ana- ‘up’ + legein ‘gather’.

==========

It is doubtful that anyone will collect the contributions to this WotD series to publish it as analects. Philosophical we have rarely been and "literary", I think not!

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:13 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:analects
(also analecta)

/ˈanəlɛkts/
plural noun
A collection of short literary or philosophical extracts.

Origin
Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek analekta ‘things gathered up’, from analegein ‘pick up’, from ana- ‘up’ + legein ‘gather’.

==========

It is doubtful that anyone will collect the contributions to this WotD series to publish it as analects. Philosophical we have rarely been and "literary", I think not!

Image


I beg to differ. I have tried to be philosophical, even sophistc on a few occasions, and I believe you have been quite "literary" on many more occasions.

Let us not argle-bargle about this. I am not ebrious enough.
Rather, let us try and convince our man in Antwerp to actually start editing our analects.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Feb 01, 2018 7:03 am

platitudinous

/ˌplatɪˈtʃuːdɪnəs/
adjective
(of a remark or statement) used too often to be interesting or thoughtful; hackneyed.

==========

The local TV station describes stories as "Breaking News" so often that the phrase has become platitudinous, "broken".

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Thu Feb 01, 2018 8:20 am

Algot Runeman wrote:platitudinous
...Image

It wouldn't have been platitudinous had it been Trump's cat ...
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:14 am

dolce

/ˈdɒltʃeɪ/
adjective & adverb
Music
(especially as a direction) sweetly and softly.

Origin
Italian, literally ‘sweet’.

==========

Rudy cringed as the violins slithered in. Everyone else seemed to think violins make sweet music, regularly marked "dolce" on the score. Rudy thought violins mainly sounded whiny and weak. A horn, now there was a sweeet sound.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:34 am

Algot Runeman wrote:dolce

I'm afraid that, ever since Federico Fellini, Anita Ekberg and my diploma, "dolce" has lost a lot of its appeal.

Spoiler: show
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You can't scroll down. Sorry!
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:26 pm

So, E.P.S., dolce will probably not be in the analects?
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:56 am

marginalia

/ˌmɑːdʒɪˈneɪlɪə/
plural noun
Notes written in the margins of a text.

Origin
Mid 19th century: from medieval Latin, neuter plural of marginalis, from margo, margin- (see margin).

==========

The character of his life appeared most clearly in the marginalia of his journals.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sat Feb 03, 2018 1:38 pm

As is well known by all mathematicians (and even a few physicists, to say nothing of lower forms of life ;) ), Fermat's marginalia in his copy of Diophantus's Arithmetica mentioned a famous so-called theorem. Had the margins been wider, Fermat claimed, his marginalia would have contained the whole proof rather than just the conclusion.

And Sir Andrew John Wiles would still be just Andrew John Wiles now.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:51 am

arsy-versy

/ɑːsɪˈvəːsi/
adverb & adjective
informal
In a confused, disordered, or perversely contrary state or manner.

Origin
Mid 16th century: from arse + Latin versus ‘turned’, the addition of -y to both elements forming a jingle.

==========

Sentence been arsy-versy has written this. [This sentence has been written arsy-versy.]

And you still want an illustration after that wonderful sentence?

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby E Pericoloso Sporgersi » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:29 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:arsy-versy...
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Seeing that illustration when I was a kid, I used to think:"My game has a bro like that!".

I couldn't say that out loud because then my dear bottom would paddle my mom for my arsy-speachy verse.

(This explains how its founders named Hasbro™."
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:42 pm

Algot Runeman wrote:arsy-versy

/ɑːsɪˈvəːsi/
adverb & adjective
informal
In a confused, disordered, or perversely contrary state or manner.

Origin
Mid 16th century: from arse + Latin versus ‘turned’, the addition of -y to both elements forming a jingle.

==========

Sentence been arsy-versy has written this. [This sentence has been written arsy-versy.]

And you still want an illustration after that wonderful sentence?

Image


D'amour mourir me font, belle Marquise, vos beaux yeux.
Vos yeux beaux d'amour me font, belle Marquise, mourir.
Mourir vos beaux yeux, belle Marquise, d'amour me font.
Me font vos yeux beaux mourir, belle Marquise, d'amour.

These four arsy-versy have been proposed by Molière's "Maître de Philosophie" to the "Bourgeois Gentilhomme" to help him court the Fair Marquise by praising her eyes, that were so beautiful he was in danger of dying of love.

But even the Maître de Philosophie agreed that
Belle Marquise, vos beaux yeux me font mourir d'amour
was the best choice.

Even in verse, the conclusion is : arsy-versy, my a*** !
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Mon Feb 05, 2018 8:29 am

outdistance

/aʊtˈdɪst(ə)ns/
verb
[with object]
Leave (a competitor or pursuer) far behind.

==========

In sport, it is perversely possible for one team to outdistance the other while their opponent outscores them. Such was the case with the Patriots/Eagles Superbowl tilt. Score trumps yards traveled in American football.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:08 pm

Two guys were hiking in the Yellowstone National Park. Despite all the advices they had received, they hiked in bear country without bear repellent sprays, and did not take the elementary precaution to make noise as they walk.
So what had to happen did happen: they unexpectedly came upon a grizzli who was surprised enough to charge them.
One of them started to run as fast as he could. The other called to him: "That's useless, no way you can outdistance this bear! "
"I don't have to", returned the first one, still running as fast as he could. "All I need is to outdistance you !"
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:07 am

jaded

/ˈdʒeɪdɪd/
adjective
1 Bored or lacking enthusiasm, typically after having had too much of something.
1.1 Irish informal Physically tired; exhausted.

Origin
Late 16th century (in the sense ‘disreputable’): from jade.

==========

Jenny had no jade rings, no stacks of bank notes. Her prospects had long ago declined and she had only her jade horse and a rickety cart. Her attitude was not jaded and she saw her outlook as thoroughly bleak.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:55 am

differentiate

/ˌdɪfəˈrɛnʃɪeɪt/
verb
[with object]
1 Recognize or ascertain what makes (someone or something) different.
1.1 differentiate between - no object Identify differences between (two or more things or people)
1.2 Make (someone or something) appear different or distinct.
2 technical Make or become different in the process of growth or development.
3 Mathematics
Transform (a function) into its derivative.

Origin
Early 19th century: from medieval Latin differentiat- ‘carried away from’, from the verb differentiare, from differentia (see differentia).

==========

In order to help his customers differentiate between the two fruit, he labeled them "A" and "B". Some of his customers actually appreciated the help.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Thu Feb 08, 2018 9:02 am

obnoxious

/əbˈnɒkʃəs/
adjective
Extremely unpleasant.

Origin
Late 16th century (in the sense ‘vulnerable to harm’): from Latin obnoxiosus, from obnoxius ‘exposed to harm’, from ob- ‘towards’ + noxa ‘harm’. The current sense, influenced by noxious, dates from the late 17th century.

==========

Sorry to be obnoxious about it, but I must remind you that the Word of the Day happens every day.

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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby voralfred » Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:57 am

Far from being obnoxious, you are admirable: after so long, you are never jaded with posting a WotD every single day. These WotD are never platitudinous. It is just that some of us lack the imagination to find an appropriate sentnece for all of them.
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Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

Postby Algot Runeman » Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:17 am

compliment

/ˈkɒmplɪm(ə)nt/
noun
1 A polite expression of praise or admiration.
1.1 An act or circumstance that implies praise or respect.
1.2 compliments Congratulations or praise expressed to someone.
1.3 compliments Formal greetings, especially when sent as a message.

verb /ˈkɒmplɪmɛnt/
[with object]
1 Politely congratulate or praise (someone) for something.
1.1 Praise (something) politely.
1.2 compliment someone with - archaic Present someone with (something) as a mark of courtesy.
Usage
Compliment (together with complimentary) is quite different in meaning from complement (and complementary). See complement

Origin
Mid 17th century: from French compliment (noun), complimenter (verb), from Italian complimento ‘fulfilment of the requirements of courtesy’, from Latin complementum ‘completion, fulfilment’ (reflected in the earlier English spelling complement, gradually replaced by the French form between 1655 and 1715).

==========

Yesterday's word of the day was not an attempt to fish for compliments, though it is easy to see why some interpreted it that way.

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