Page 314 of 322

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2018 12:19 pm
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:elegant

Again, Judy ?

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2018 1:02 pm
by Algot Runeman
Judy!

It must be nice, E.P.S., to have so nearly a one-track mind.

:D

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 7:35 am
by Algot Runeman
otiose

/ˈəʊʃɪəʊz//ˈəʊtɪəʊz//ˈəʊtɪəʊs//ˈəʊʃɪəʊs/
adjective
1 Serving no practical purpose or result.
2 archaic Indolent or idle.

Origin
Late 18th century: from Latin otiosus, from otium ‘leisure’.

==========

Providing a definition of otiose provides a practical purpose. Reading the definition might be valuable, but illustrating otiose may not serve much purpose.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 9:24 am
by Algot Runeman
taskbar


/ˈtɑːskbɑː/
noun
Computing
A bar at the edge of the display of a graphical user interface that allows quick access to current or favourite applications.

==========

Today's illustration of a partial taskbar (mine) will come as no surprise to all of you who use a computer to access the Word of the Day.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2018 11:18 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:taskbar

It also reminds me of teacher's taskbar she used to rap our knuckles with when we were being naughty in the classroom.

Spoiler: show
Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 7:26 am
by Algot Runeman
honeyfuggle
(also honeyfogle, honeyfugle, honeyfoogle)

/ˈhʌnɪˌfʌɡl/
verb
US
informal
1 To deceive, swindle; to cajole.
2 no object - To act in an underhand, indirect, or ingratiating manner in order to deceive a person or to obtain something.

Origin
Early 19th century. Apparently from honey + fugle.

==========

Such was the trust held by the drum major that the band followed him even when he honeyfugled them from the parade route.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 10:15 am
by voralfred
Now, EPS, be honest: how many people did you honeyfuggle into eating a lot of honey, fudge, sweets, candy and other pleasant-tasting but teeth-damaging substances, just so that they would have to become your patients?
You, honeyfuggler, you !

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 6:51 am
by Algot Runeman
carton

/ˈkɑːt(ə)n/
noun
1 A small, light box or container in which drinks or foodstuffs are packaged.
1.1 North American A large container of goods.

Origin
Early 19th century: from French, from Italian cartone (see cartoon).

==========

Calvin constructed a cartoon containing a carton of milk.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 1:28 pm
by Algot Runeman
regale

/rɪˈɡeɪl/
verb
[with object]
1 Entertain or amuse (someone) with talk.
1.1 Lavishly supply (someone) with food or drink.

Origin
Mid 17th century: from French régaler, from re- (expressing intensive force) + Old French gale ‘pleasure’.

The goal of the Word of the Day is to regale YOU with options of the English language. Your responses are welcome, but not manditory.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2018 6:35 pm
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:carton

Also Pauline Carton, legendary French film actress.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2018 7:08 am
by Algot Runeman
maleficent

/məˈlɛfɪs(ə)nt/
adjective
literary
Causing harm or destruction, especially by supernatural means.

==========

Mark loved Halloween, when he worked hard to dress up as some magnificently maleficent being.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 7:19 am
by Algot Runeman
distal

/ˈdɪst(ə)l/
adjective
Anatomy
1 Situated away from the centre of the body or from the point of attachment.
The opposite of proximal
1.1 Geology Relating to or denoting the outer part of an area affected by geological activity.

Origin
Early 19th century: from distant, on the pattern of words such as dorsal.

==========

Jill used the distal end of her index finger to point mockingly at her husband. He deserved it.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2018 10:01 pm
by voralfred
E Pericoloso Sporgersi wrote:
Algot Runeman wrote:carton

Also Pauline Carton, legendary French film actress.


Oh yes, Pauline Carton, such a great actress, who regaled generations of movie-goers (or should one write: movie goers ?).
I dont' think she ever played a role of a maleficent character.

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2018 7:15 am
by Algot Runeman
natant

/ˈneɪt(ə)nt/
adjective
literary, technical
Swimming or floating.

Origin
Mid 18th century: from Latin natant- ‘swimming’, from the verb natare.

---------O-----

The waterlilies of North America have natant leaves which provide a perch for small frogs and frequent dragonfly visitors.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 7:24 am
by Algot Runeman
vinification

/ˌvɪnɪfɪˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
mass noun
The conversion of grape juice or other vegetable extract into wine by fermentation.

==========

Although vinification can be considered both natural and organic, it results in intoxication, something not to be considered normal.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 6:09 am
by Algot Runeman
persnickety

/pəˈsnɪkɪti/
adjective
North American
informal
1 Placing too much emphasis on trivial or minor details; fussy.
1.1 Requiring a particularly precise or careful approach.

Origin
Late 19th century: alteration of pernickety.

==========

Paul placed too much persnikety emphasis on getting the button sewed to his cap. That it was totally useless there didn't seem to bother him at all.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 5:25 am
by Algot Runeman
uncinate

/ˈʌnsɪnət//ˈʌnsɪneɪt/
adjective
Anatomy
Having a hooked shape.

Origin
Mid 18th century: from Latin uncinatus, from uncinus ‘hook’.

==========

The scorpion had an uncinate tail with an uncinate stinger at the end. John was hooked on scorpions.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:08 am
by Algot Runeman
elder

/ˈɛldə/
noun
1 one's elder - People who are older than one.
1.1 one's elder A person who is older than one by a specified length of time.
2 often elders - A leader or senior figure in a tribe or other group.
2.1 An official in the early Christian Church, or of various Protestant Churches and sects.
2.2 historical A member of a senate or governing body.

Origin
Old English ieldra, eldra, of Germanic origin; related to German älter, also to eld and old.

==========

Bessey was actually the elder of the pair. She had faithfully been Ben's companion since his birth. She occasionally, though reluctantly, deferred to his most foolish plans, but loved to go everywhere with him. She missed him when he was at school.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 11:37 am
by E Pericoloso Sporgersi
Algot Runeman wrote:elder

The Dutch word "elders" means "elsewhere".

So sometimes one wishes elders to be "elders"! :butter:

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 4:05 pm
by voralfred
I always thought that it ws on purpose that J.K. Rowlings chose to make the wand that belonged to the Deathly Hallow in wood of elder. The pun between the tree and the idea that the wand was very old, or belonged to a respected ancestor, was very strong.
Alas, in french translation, the pun was lost. "La baguette de sureau" is very anticliamatic....

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 7:55 am
by Algot Runeman
jussive

/ˈdʒʌsɪv/
adjective
Grammar
(of a form of a verb) expressing a command.

Origin
Mid 19th century: from Latin juss- ‘commanded’ (from the verb jubere) + -ive.

==========

"Go, go, go!" is well documented in film as the appropriate jussive verb usage at the start of an attack. It is not documented why three repetitions is considered necessary.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 5:56 am
by voralfred
In french, as I just found out (I did not know it five minutes ago), the adjective jussif (which becomes jussive when employed to qualify a feminine noun : "une intonation jussive") does exist, with the same meaning as the english jussive.
But at first glance it evokes the much more interesting word jouissif.

Alas, in english, the pun is lost, since the wiktionary entry https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/jouissif leads to "pleasurable".

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 6:13 am
by Algot Runeman
monument

/ˈmɒnjʊm(ə)nt/
noun
1 A statue, building, or other structure erected to commemorate a notable person or event.
1.1 A statue or other structure placed over a grave in memory of the dead.
1.2 A building, structure, or site that is of historical importance or interest.
1.3 An enduring and memorable example of something.

Origin
Middle English (denoting a burial place): via French from Latin monumentum, from monere ‘remind’.

==========

Every year, more monuments get put in place to remind us just how many horrible things humans do to one another, though that's not the stated reason.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 6:14 am
by Algot Runeman
reputation

/rɛpjʊˈteɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
1 The beliefs or opinions that are generally held about someone or something.
1.1 A widespread belief that someone or something has a particular characteristic.

Origin
Middle English: from Latin reputatio(n-), from reputare ‘think over’ (see repute).

==========

Joe valued his reputation, though he was only aware of it through his friends. Those beyond his sphere had quite a different opinion.

Image

Re: GAME: Word of the Day (WOTD)

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 11:36 pm
by voralfred
OK, this is a bi-lingual pun I cannot resist.
There is a famous monument in Germany called Emperor William's Monument, in german Kaiser-Wilhelm-Denkmal.
This monument had a disastrous effect on this Emperor's reputation. Indeed, as my german-speaking mother used to tell me, if "Denkmal" does means monument, if you cut it in halves "Denk mal !" means "Think a bit !", "Think again !".
So if you pronounce "Kaiser Wilhelm, Denk mal !", separating the syllables "denk" and "mal", it sounds as if Emperor William was such an idiot that one had constantly to tell him that his ideas were ridiculous and he had to reconsider. Or that his actions were foolish, as if he did not think at all before acting.
I'm afraid I find it hard to communicate to a non-german-speaking person the full implications of "Denk mal !", but this jussive expression is mostly told to children, to scold them when they did something particularly foolish. Having it said to you is not at all pleasurable (pas du tout jouissif).
In french, to express "Denk mal !", my mother rather used the expression "T'es bête, ou quoi ?", approximatively "You're an idiot, aren't you ?"